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Easy methods to jack car up


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Unable to justify a hydraulic scissor jack, so has anyone come up with an easier way to jack the car up onto axle stands other than the traditional 'bit at a time' front to back with a trolley jack.

 

Has anyone used one of these?

 

http://www.sgs-engineering.com/tj3b-3-ton-trolley-jack-and-jacking-beam

 

What about this type of ramp?

 

http://www.cjautos.eu/product_p/cr01.htm

 

Or this, but it looks a bit flimsy

 

http://www.cjautos.eu/product_p/cl01.htm

 

I can remember seeing a video on the internet where the guy attached a hydraulic foot pump to the lifting device to elevate the scissor jack but can't seem to find it again. Anyone remember such a product?

 

Richard

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hi,

the method I use is conventional drive ramps on ramps,taper modified with extension piece to clear the spoiler.

 

Once car upon ramps, you can easily use a jacking beam to lift the wheels of the ramps,slide the ramps under the beam for security.

 

I have seen the CJ type of ramp displayed at car shows,personally would not go underneath car with this system.

 

regards Angus

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I am a wuss when it comes to the car on 4 axle stands, so use wooden blocks (cut down railway sleepers), although does need the wheels on. I keep looking at the mini tilter type arrangements, but I am also concerned that they look a bit under-engineered and I would also struggle for space getting it under the car. May just save my pennies and get one of the hydraulic jobbies at some stage.

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Dunno, I jack the ar%e up from the centre of the engine to get the rear onto the axle stands, then use a trolley jack either side on the front lift pads to get the front up. Never seems that much of a chore?!

 

None of this bit at time malarkey.

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I just pump each side up by myself, usually half way one side, then fully up the other and locate the axle stand then back round to pump up and locate the stand on the other side.

 

Keeping an eye on the rears just in case then begin to lean, if they do I just give the car a shove back so all feet are on the ground.

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My approach is as follows -

 

If the wheels are to come off when it is up in the air I first loosen all the nuts off and retighten to a firm hand tight.

 

I jack the front first with a low entry trolley jack under the towing eye on the front of the front T'bar. I get it high enough to put an axel stand under each of the front T'bar covers (you need to position the jack to give enough room for the axel stand to fit with the jack in place).

 

Then trolley jack under the engine, making sure the trolley jack castor wheels are aligned to move backward easily, handbrake off, and jack slowly keeping an eye on the front axel stands to make sure they don't tilt/move. As a precaution I put the axel stands under the rear T'bar covers as soon as possible, at their lowest setting, and raise them incrementally as I jack to the desired height.

 

Then I double check everything is stable and try to shake the car, just to make sure, before I get under it!

 

This is done on a very level and smooth garage floor, I would tack a more cautious approach if the floor was less perfect.

 

Mark

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I have a less than flat dirt floor. :-(

My method is to jack each rear up, putting a breeze block (with a piece of thin wood on top) under the bottom of the shock absorbers.

Round to the front, nearside first and onto a stand, then as said previously, under the towing eye and the next stand. Both stands are put on some wood to stop them sinking.

Confession time, I tried to use four stands once and had all the wheels off, came home one weekend to find the car nicely resting on its belly.....

Paul

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Have just come in from the garage - lowered the grolden bogey onto its wheels for the first time in 18 months. I had the back on 600mm high stands under rear TB covers and fronts on small stands on front TBs. I have one of the low entry aluminium jacks that are commonplace these days. With a piece of 2x4 on the front crossmember (ahead of fuel tank) I could lower onto wheels in one go and just get the jack out from under the valence. I don't have a chin spoiler though...

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Hi Richard,

 

I've recently considered all those pieces of kit.

 

I don't particularly like ramps ... Mainly because it's more difficult to use when you are on your own. I had a bad experience once when I drove an MG on ramps - the wheels hit the stops at the end, and pivoted the ramp forward, causing the sloping part to shoot up and wack both sills. Hence, now I like to see what I'm doing! Also, the main disadvantage is their use is limited, given you can't take the wheels off.

 

The cj autos tilting machine is interesting, but I'm not sure how it supports our cars. Also, I think it's quite a heavy piece of kit that takes up a lot of room. Also, it seems quite a long and laborious process to raise it.

 

I came to the conclusion that take some of the angst out of raising with a trolley jack by buying a decent one. My Clarke 2t trolley jack was high lift, but the lowering was hard to control, and could drop the car at some speed . I have just bought one of these beasties:

 

http://www.sgs-engineering.com/hydraulic-jacks/trolley-jacks/tj3lp-low-profile-garage-trolley-jack

 

It's a well made piece of kit and has a slow release valve. I also intend to buy some of these too:

 

http://www.sgs-engineering.com/hydraulic-jacks/axle-stands/jsr6-ratchet-axle-stands

 

I think the 12t limit should provide a bit of confidence! I've also bought 4x mechanic foam mats for comfort under the car .- don't have just one, because you need to move around. That made a big difference on the comfort side.

 

Lastly, jacking method. I jack under the engine to raise the rear. I have a paperback book wrapped in duck tape between the jack and the engine which works really well, and can jack up to the full 53cm range on the above jack. If I wanted all four wheels off the ground, I would put the rear on axle stands first, then jack the front at either one or both forward jacking points. You do t need much force since the front is relatively light and the weight of the engine helps to raise the front, since the car is pivoting around the rear jack points or torsion bars.

If I was just raising the front, I use 2 jacks on the front jack points.

 

Hope that helps

M.

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Ive just bought these http://www.costco.co.uk/view/product/uk_catalog/cos_8,cos_8.5,cos_8.5.10/139570

 

From Costco, seemed decent value as I only paid 11.99 + VAT, they also bought a 2 ton Draper Jack like this http://www.justoffbase.co.uk/Expert-2-Tonne-Low-Profile-Trolley-Jack-With-Quick-Lift-Facility-31481-Draper?gclid=CKzCvvOZwMICFQMYwwodkVIAEAfor £80+Vat

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Agree with the theory of forces that Dom says but the problem with jacking up the rear first is that there is minimal clearance under the front to get a jack in. I go with Jonny on this one.....jack up the front cross member just enough to get axle stands in on the front suspension, then to the rear and jack under the crankcase to get stands under the torsion tubes. I prefer then going back to the front and jacking up a bit more, then back to the rear to to the same until I can get approx. 600mm stands in all round. This makes for easier access under the car for a not so supple body! As a safety precaution, I have some heavily reinforced thick plywood boxes to use as packing placed under the sills (just in case), plus extra smaller axle stands placed under the wheel hubs. I do have a very good level garage floor tho' which helps, plus a Webber high-lift jack (700mm lift).

Regards,

D.

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I use a similar approach to David above but using two wheels stands at the front that I made from some timbers left over from our extension - once the front end's on these I can jack the back up without any risk of the front falling off axles stands etc. I do have to park the rear on a couple of 6"x2" timbers first so I can get a jack under when the front's up on stands.

 

DSC01035.jpg

 

With the back end jacked up as well:

 

DSC01033.jpg

 

Before working underneath I put second set of stands under the sills as an extra safety measure

 

DSC01042.jpg

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I found that this worked best over the past two years:

 

The car is too low for the lift so I had a couple of ramps made to raise the car over the lift.

 

Takes up no space in the garage as the car sits on top of the lift.

 

Fitting rear wheel arch liners and ready for MoT any day now.

 

 

post-6365-0-11431600-1418462598_thumb.jpg

post-6365-0-16167700-1418462654_thumb.jpg

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How safe is it to work under the car when it's up on 4 axle stands?

 

Has anyone modified axle stands to take the machined jack pads you can buy which locate in the 4 jacking positions on the floor pan.

 

Richard

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How safe is it to work under the car when it's up on 4 axle stands?

As long as everything is level and the stands are securely holding up the car, should be no problem.

 

If in doubt put a wheel (or 2) under the car, or blocks of wood.

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+1. I think you will be surprised how steady it all will be if u give it a go. IMHO I would limit the use to general repair work that didn't involve significant forces - that would cover you for 95% + of jobs. I wouldn't use it to do an engine change , but I think plenty do.

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Looking at the SGS stuff and it looks quite impressive. So think I will get a combination of high lift trolley jack and some sturdy axle stands. Think I will also make up some wooden blocks similar to MaxDiesel for when the wheels don't need to come off.

 

Does anyone use a creeper and if so how high do you need to get the car to be able to use?

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I like the axle stand modification - good idea.

I was very tempted to buy a crawler too - my neighbour has one. He said he used it once 20 years ago and hasn't used it since.

 

The main issue is if you try and undo a nut, you will move before the nut rotates!

 

These are very good .... Under £20 /mat from Halfords --

 

http://i1381.photobucket.com/albums/ah224/Mobydick100/mats/b1e647183de47a633ac3c036fffdc37b_zpsb3deace0.jpg

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