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reddevil

Red Devil's Blue Devil 3.2 Carrera hot rod

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Yup, circuit supplies have 'em... £150!!!

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EBC are fine if you treat them as regular pads and would expect them perfectly up to the job on the rear. I ran a pair of red EBC on the front for years and were fine as a daily driver, still have them somewhere. Then had some DS3000 on the front which ate through the rotors and coated the inside of the rims with debris, did stop well though.

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Yup, circuit supplies have 'em... £150!!!

And?

 

What price is too high to not stopping reliably....?

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£150 is ridiculous for a pair of rears. Eurocarparts list Pagid Textar and Ate all less than £55 for the rears. Can't imagine any of those branded pads being unreliable.

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Nothing wrong with boggo standard pads , Textars in mine

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Aren't Textar listed a OEM from Tripe anyway?

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£150 is ridiculous for a pair of rears. Eurocarparts list Pagid Textar and Ate all less than £55 for the rears. Can't imagine any of those branded pads being unreliable.

Just for the rears, yes. I think my set of 2500's were £130 from Tuthills.

 

Nothing wrong with boggo standard pads , Textars in mine

Boggo pads were scarily pants when I tried them.

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Tuthills coming in at £60+VAT for an axle set, perhaps you got two sets?

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Tuthills coming in at £60+VAT for an axle set, perhaps you got two sets?

Fronts and rears got replaced at the same time.

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Cool. Circuit supplies got the wrong part number, they are £69 all in so better than Tuthills.

 

Chris

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OK, got the car back, first impressions are it's literally a lot easier to drive, the suspension is a lot ness noisy (!) it's not as eager to jump around on a bumpy road, the ride is very good and the car "flows" a lot better for fast A-road driving.

 

The feel through the steering wheel is much, much better and you can really place the car precisely.

 

It could do with a little more bite on turn in, but that's a minor grumble really, probably need to drive it a bit more (in the dry too!).

 

The cambers are quite conservative going from over -2deg back to -1.4, 6 minutes of toe in on the front, 12 on the rear, and as much castor as possible (>5 deg from memory).

 

Ride heights have been raised a touch front and rear too.

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:signs85:

 

Now put some miles on the damn thing.

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It was reading really well until the last sentence :)

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Well, it's all relative. It was really low to start with. The new heights are 130mm front, 256mm rear, +15 and +9 respectively.

 

Corner weights are literally spot on, 0kgs difference diag front to rear.

 

Nige, despite the problems thus far, I have managed about 4000 since Oct! Going up to Scotland week after next, Cairngorms then across to Islay, so another 2k on the cards :flag:

 

Next problem to sort is there seems to be an exhaust gas leak into the heat exchangers, of course they are built around the headers, so not so easy to fix. I went across to see Chris at Fenn Lane Motorsport today, they are going to take a peak when I get back from Scotland, as well as an oil service. Meanwhile ordered a CO meter for the interior, CoG pointed out this could be pumping fumes into the cabin...

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What make are the headers on this?

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IIRC, they are the 1 3/4 inch OBX ones from the US that are made in China. I had the 1 5/8 version before TT made ones with better collectors.

 

Turn the heat off = no fumes. Buy a cheap plug in seat heater - they actually work pretty well.

 

Great to hear the car drives well. If you have adjustable rear ARB, then you can run that in the hardest setting to change the balance a little or even drop some pressure from the front tyres. Also, the faster you drive these cars, the more they are willing to turn in as the rear weight bias comes into play once they are up on tip toes. That's a Friday afternoon technical explanation - LOL

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TRE equal length headers. Not sure if that's the same as wot Richard said.

 

Yup, at Oulton even before the setup (but post-damper rebuild) it responded very well to some much harder driving. The diff and getting on the power early makes a huge difference to the line you can pick. Hard to do on the road nowadays.

 

Really looking forward to getting it back out again and seeing what it is like now the geo is A1.

 

On heat will turn it off if indeed CO is leaking into the cabin. Will have a look at the seat heater but main problem is cold feet with this car + Scotland. Must buy thicker socks.


Where did you get your heated seat pads Richard? I was actually going to wire something in (rather than plug-in).

 

I have Pole Positions.

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My car had new SS heat exchangers fitted shortly before I bought it, but it has always been a bit wiffy inside and I've never managed to completely shut off the heat despite fitting new flap valves. Even with good HEs could exhaust gases still find its way into the cabin? I assume a CO detector like I have in the house would flag up a dangerous situation? Thanks Tim

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On heat will turn it off if indeed CO is leaking into the cabin.

I assume a CO detector like I have in the house would flag up a dangerous situation?

Guys, an internal combustion engine is not a faulty central heating boiler, or gas fire. Exhaust fumes getting in the cabin is serious, but CO is not your problem and a CO meter is a bad indicator of danger.

 

There are relatively low levels of CO in car exhaust, in a properly tuned warmed up engine it is only a few %. It is higher in a cold engine and/or one that is not burning all the fuel properly.

 

The major constituents of petrol engine exhaust are Nitrogen and Carbon dioxide, with low levels of oxides of Nitrogen (NOX) and Carbon monoxide, water vapour and some other stuff.

 

The reason exhaust gasses can kill you in a confined space is due to suffocation, i.e. lack of Oxygen, because the Oxygen has mostly been used up in the combustion process.

 

You would pass out and crash into a tree long before you could get CO poisoning when driving a car. Exhaust leaking into the cabin will make you drowsy and light headed due to reduced available Oxygen.

 

In our cars, corroded, or damaged, heat exchanger outer skins will not allow exhaust gasses into the cabin, there is positive pressure from the fan meaning air will exit the holes. It is only if the exhaust primaries (headers) within the heat exchangers are leaking that you could get exhaust in the cabin.

 

It is possible for the engine fan to suck in exhaust fumes from under the car if you are sitting in traffic and the rubber seal around the engine tin is missing, or significantly damaged. When under way this would not be a problem.

 

Our cars are also prone to be wiffy from minor oil leaks allowing oil to be burnt on hot engine/exhaust parts, unpleasant but not dangerous like exhaust fumes in the cabin. Burnt oil is the aroma of an air cooled engine!

 

If you suspect the primaries are leaking, do not drive the car. Get it checked out and fixed.

 

If it is just burnt oil smell, drive it more, get it really hot and it will decrease.

 

 

:twocents:

 

Mark

Edited by SilverWT

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Mark, thanks for the lesson! I actually don't mind the wiffiness, it's the passengers that object. But I will get it checked. Tim

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ignore, realised I was replying to an old post

Edited by MarkJ

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Going to do a little experimentation today. I'm not convinced there is a manifold leak as inside the car does not smell of fumes, nor does it smell of burnt oil as Timmy's does. I'll approach the idea of a CO meter with skepticism (was suggested by Fenn Lane by the way) although it might be of some use to test when the car is stone cold and it produces more CO.

 

The heat has never worked well. The tubing to the heat exchangers from the engine fan are actually only loosely held on so I'll jubilee clip these on to make sure the engine fan is pumping air through and then see what effect this has.

 

By the way Timmy I am in Worcester too, I will wave if I see your Targa!

 

Chris

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As a safety professional I strongly urge you to not ignore the risk from CO. The levels produced by impact bumpers cars is not trivial. My 3.2 was putting out 1.74% CO at its recent MOT (pass up to 4.5%). The effects of various concentrations of CO are shown below:

 

Concentration Symptoms 35 ppm (0.0035%) Headache and dizziness within six to eight hours of constant exposure 100 ppm (0.01%) Slight headache in two to three hours 200 ppm (0.02%) Slight headache within two to three hours; loss of judgment 400 ppm (0.04%) Frontal headache within one to two hours 800 ppm (0.08%) Dizziness, nausea, and convulsions within 45 min; insensible within 2 hours 1,600 ppm (0.16%) Headache, increased heart rate, dizziness, and nausea within 20 min; death in less than 2 hours 3,200 ppm (0.32%) Headache, dizziness and nausea in five to ten minutes. Death within 30 minutes. 6,400 ppm (0.64%) Headache and dizziness in one to two minutes. Convulsions, respiratory arrest, and death in less than 20 minutes. 12,800 ppm (1.28%) Unconsciousness after 2–3 breaths. Death in less than three minutes.

Assuming that the CO concentration is diluted by a factor of 10 in the cabin you can expect a Headache, increased heart rate, dizziness, and nausea within 20 min; death in less than 2 hours.

 

Last year we were ran the engines from our two impact bumpers for a short time in our garage with the main door open. A side door that connects to our house was open and about 30 min after turning off the engines the CO alarm in our kitchen about 30 m from the garage went into alarm.

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I am confused, how could 1.28% cause "unconsciousness after 2-3 breaths" but MOT pass rate be set at 4.5%?

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I am confused, how could 1.28% cause "unconsciousness after 2-3 breaths" but MOT pass rate be set at 4.5%?

 

I believe the MOT values are the concentration in the exhaust pipe. As soon as it leaves the exhaust in to fresh air it is diluted substantially. Leaks into the car from defective headers would be diluted to some degree, but by no means to safe levels.

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