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We had a bike thread a while back, time for a new one.

Got back on two wheels earlier this year as part of correcting my work/life balance. I had taken a few years out to do some building and just deal with life in general leaving no time for bikes.

I came back via an '02 650 BMW to start small and find my bearings again. Forgot how much better you feel when you've been out on a bike for a few hundred miles so clocked up huge miles in a fortnight! Swapped the 650 for an '05 1150 GS Adventure after a couple of weeks. My GSA is a late UK twinspark, non-ABS example with full luggage, Sargent (dwarf) seat, lots of history and farkles galore.

A pic of mine below, just after pickup in Durham. What have you got?

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here is mine

I added a 2005 Ducati Monster 800 S i.e. to the stable last week. I owned a very late carbed 750 Monster a few years back, which was a lovely bike to ride but it suffered from chronic carb icing, was

Does this count chaps? I’ve had a hankering every year for at least the last 10 years to pass my bike test. The hankering was really strong this year so (at 53 yrs old) finally decided to do my C

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Similar story here, had a 15 year break from bikes but jumped back in 3 years ago with a Harley 883 Roadster (it was racing orange and sounded great) followed by a BMW F800R and then in May this year a BMW S1000R Sport.

The S1000 is a fantastic bike to ride 160+ bhp, 80 Nm of torque and weighing around 200 kg's (0-60 sub 3 seconds & 0-120mph sub 7 seconds!) equipped with abs, traction control, electronic suspension and a quick shift that allows for clutchless upshifts however after the initial disappointment surrounding the lack of quality - it just feels cheap, it got worse when after a wet ride it developed an electrical fault. This was traced to a break in the wiring resulting in Williams Manchester slicing the loom and returning the bike back with the repaired area wrapped in insulation tape. After voicing my dissatisfaction a full loom was eventually fitted but I had fallen out of love with the bike so it had to go.

After a bit of looking around for something with character it soon became apparent that the move to euro4 regs at the start of 2017 was killing a number of air-cooled bikes so I took the plunge and bought a Moto Guzzi Griso 1200 Rosso Trophy. It's only 110 bhp but has around 80 pounds of torque.

I will try to get some photo's added later.

Your GS looks fun. Pre liquid cooled BM's have the built from granite feel about them and will give almost unlimited years of riding pleasure.

Many years ago I owned a BM R75 S6 at the time it was the wrong bike for giddy teenager but out of all the bikes that have passed through my possession, it's one of the few that I would like to own again.

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Yes, GS is great and built like a proper BM or old 911. A friend has an F800R and the difference in build quality is obvious - he doesn't see it that way, of course :D

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Been in bikes since I was 12 and had a chicken chaser as a field bike. Bought my first Ducati, 748 mono, about 18 months after buying my 86' 3.2.

Still have the 86 3.2, but swapped the Ducati a few times. Had my current Ducati, a 749r 2004 homolgation model for the last 10 years. As an homologation model, it's basically a race bike with head lights. Carbon fibre everything, magnesium valve covers, head light bucket, factory slipper clutch, ohlins all round, radial brembo, larger fuel tank, titanium rods and valves, short stroke motor, special gear ratios etc etc

Basically, Ducati were allowed to remove the lights and fit race tyres .... Then race it in World Super Sport series.

Love the Ducati and 911 equally, the engineering in both of them is very special.post-12183-0-65338400-1478723395_thumb.jpg

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One of mine. A great machine which I have totally restored from the ground up. What blast and what a noise! By today's standards it is slow but it has such presence. I love it.post-1702-0-01951700-1478724664_thumb.jpg

Cheers

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A grand thread. Some of my shonkers.

A fine tool for all purposes.

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A very silly bike.

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This one sounds nice.

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This one sounds even better.
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This one is very shiny.

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This one smells nice.

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This one raced in the 2008 Supermotard World Championship.

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This one raced at the 1994 Singles TT.

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This is ex-Kawasaki Italia.

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And this scares me a great deal.

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There are a few others dotted about the place but I can't find any pictures...

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Haha, that post is a thread all on its own!

I plan to buy a second bike next year as a toehold into UK green laning. Honda CR250F most likely. Got a big tax bill to pay first ;)

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OK - at the risk of being shot down in flames - what is it about bikes? They changed the law so that a 16 year old couldn't ride a bike a couple of years before I got there so I went straight to cars. I can really admire the look of bikes and love some of the engineering etc but have never driven one on the road - what am I missing?

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If you need to ask I doubt they are going to be your thing.

They make a bike to suit many varying needs.

If you want a fast bike then you can buy something that bends physics for under £15K.

Bike have many drawbacks and I am sure most of the above have bits missing from knees, elbows etc but when everything falls into place - weather, mood, road, etc then few things beat a bike for deep visceral pleasure.

Why not find a training centre, book a lesson and see if you fancy working towards your licence. Even if you don't want a bike it's a bit of fun and another string to your bow.

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I'm not a biker either Roy, but I totally understand the attraction. Never ventured down that road when I was younger and I've been given spousal veto :smash: now I'm married with child. I have several close friends who are keen bikers and I think there is a sense of freedom and camaraderie that doesn't exist in a tin box. We have a friend who co-owns a sidecar outfit and he was racing at Oliver's Mount. I went over in the GT3 one Sunday morning, over the Wolds and accompanied by a ZZR1400, an R1 and a Triumph Tiger. I say accompanied but you somewhat lag behind a convoy like that, because despite the fact they are all experienced riders and not loonies you just cannot make the progress on four wheels. I was envious the whole way there and back.

The ZZR1400 has now been replaced by a far more sensible Ducato Multistrada, although I still don't understand the concept of a brake caliper with the bleed nipple at the bottom :doh2: Italian design for you! It looks fantastic in every respect though, is far easier to live with than a nutty 1400 and is probably the type of thing I'd aspire to if I ever took the plunge. I'd agree with the above; have a go on one of the introduction courses and see if you like it.

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OK - at the risk of being shot down in flames - what is it about bikes? They changed the law so that a 16 year old couldn't ride a bike a couple of years before I got there so I went straight to cars. I can really admire the look of bikes and love some of the engineering etc but have never driven one on the road - what am I missing?

There is no insulation on a motorcycle: you are in the experience from the minute you throw a leg over the saddle. The flow from one corner to another, the way it moves around, the air around you, the throttle making the thing you are stting on go that bit quicker almost before you twist the grip.

Whether chugging around town on a 125 and going straight to the front of traffic light queues or out on the open road, being immersed in the sounds and smells of your surroundings, you cannot beat the feeling of freedom when riding a motorcycle.

A 911 feels close in some ways, and of course it is safer at speed. A bike accident payout was how I bought my first 911 and it was worth the time off work!

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my wee beasty...air cooled natch :)

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I've never been a big bike guy, I've done some work for a mates Moto 3 team in the past to help him out and I get the bike 'thing', I just never really got involved as I kinda knew that if I did I would probably end up in a box.

Got to say that is a very good looking machine that you've got there Mark. Very nice mate :wub:

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OK - at the risk of being shot down in flames - what is it about bikes? They changed the law so that a 16 year old couldn't ride a bike a couple of years before I got there so I went straight to cars. I can really admire the look of bikes and love some of the engineering etc but have never driven one on the road - what am I missing?

I must be a bit older than you Roy as you could do that when I was 16. I know that because two of my classmates were dead within their first year, one ironically skidded on wet Autumn leaves, went over a churchyard wall and hit a gravestone. Still, didn't have to go far for the funeral.?

Mum was an insurance broker so we had a deal about keeping off bikes, she'd lost too many clients over the years. I had a car at 16. Twinny Minor had the same deal.

Like looking at old bikes for the simplicity and would have a Ducati on a lit rostrum in my house for the art. I totally get the vibe, but someone pulls out without looking or opens their car door, and no matter how good a rider you are you're hitting the Tarmac. The outcome is then largely a matter of luck.

VT

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IIRC I was about two years off getting the 16 year old licence! I suppose I had the same unwritten deal - keep away from bikes and we'll keep you mobile in cars. Dad was in the police and I was told of times shovelling up remains after horrific crashes which added to it all. I suppose it's like an old girlfriend - miles better off now but what if!

I'll put it on the back burner along with skiing - old joints take a long time to mend!

Sorry to add doom and gloom to such a great thread - as they used to say in Hill Street Blues - be safe out there!

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Like looking at old bikes for the simplicity and would have a Ducati on a lit rostrum in my house for the art. I totally get the vibe, but someone pulls out without looking or opens their car door, and no matter how good a rider you are you're hitting the Tarmac. The outcome is then largely a matter of luck.

If you believe in luck then better you stay off two wheels! A motorcyclist makes their own luck, by riding a well maintained bike within the limits of what is visible and wearing the right gear.

Everyone knows someone who died on two wheels when they were a teenager. I also know people who died from solvent abuse and joyriding when 16. Teenagers do not serve as an example for mortality rates among 50-something bikers and the kid I knew who died on a scooter (with bald tyres and no lights) in 1985 does not put me off getting my own teenagers on scooters as soon as they're old enough.

Lots of people have bikes and never have an accident. I had a couple of accidents when commuting in London (people wiping me out) but the overall two-wheeled package is worth it.

I will die happy if I go on two wheels: better than dying from worrying about stuff that might happen. Get out and do something fun with life other than mowing the lawn and going to Buble concerts!

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If you believe in luck then better you stay off two wheels! A motorcyclist makes their own luck, by riding a well maintained bike within the limits of what is visible and wearing the right gear.

Went to the BRE to do some work earlier this week. Malcolm is the engineer I work with there. Nice quiet chap, early 60's, known him over 10 years. Long time biker. No car. Owns a couple of classics and does a few Euro and Nordic trips with a classic bike group each year. I guess you'd put him in the "experienced and sensible" bucket. Anyway, he looked a bit second hand so I asked what was up. Turned out he'd recently bought a new bike (no clue what) and last week, riding down a dual carriage way, a guy pulled into his lane without looking or indicating and wiped him out. He bounced down the road for a bit, which was quiet so he didn't get run over (I guess that bit might be considered good fortune as he was in the RH lane?) The bike was written off. I was just happy he wasn't badly injured.

I will die happy if I go on two wheels: better than dying from worrying about stuff that might happen. Get out and do something fun with life other than mowing the lawn and going to Buble concerts!

Excellent mindset. The girls would be so proud. Gardening and Bubbles are Mrs VT's thing, I'm excused both fortunately. Drive the 997 every week, mostly with the lid down and loving the trackdays with the Hairdryer. Might do a bit of sprinting when it's done.

As I said I quite like bikes, not the new stupid bonkers modern kit, but older English stuff, and I appreciate the engineering. I think MotoGP is a better watch than F1 and me and Twinny Minor have talked about going and watching the TT, which has to be spectacular, it's just I have no interest in riding one. Never have had. My dad and all our family were car blokes. I grew up around car garages. Bikes were never on the scene even with my close friends. If I ever feel life needs a change of pace I can always buy a Caterham........or stand in a bowl of water and stick a screwdriver in a power socket ?

Keep safe. And one more thing....when are you going to get the fecking Orange sorted out? I miss that car's presence here big time. ?

VT

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Here are my two. I haven't done many miles on the KTM but love it for hacking round London. I made the mistake of taking the zed apart to fettle it and it got a bit out of hand. I've had it for a long while now and wouldn't part with it.

David

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Some tasty kit on here :cool: I think Runners wins hands down with the photography, scenery and range of bikes :)

As John and others echo, its the sense of freedom and 'hell yeah', you get on a bike and the fact you can take in everything around you if cruising along. Nothing really gets in your way and you can crack on as you wish for the most part. I am really a car man but driving lately frustrates the hell out of me in the UK, you cant go anywhere or have any fun without sitting in traffic jams or keeping an eye open for unmarked police cars and endless traffic cameras...boo!! :(

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