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911 Left foot braking.


Michael

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Any others here worship at the alter for Left foot Braking?

Today most pro drivers left foot brake as they began racing at a young age in go carts where you have to left foot brake.

I have to say left foot braking was my best ever improvement for car control.

I practice it on the street daily in whatever car I'm driving.

Since I do wear a larger size 13 shoe dancing on the peddles can be a little awkward.

Now days I could not track a 911 without braking with my left foot.

After a few years tracking my 911 I had the heal toe downshift footwork down.

So I then gave the left brake technique a try.

The first track day my biggest mistake was roaring onto the main straight with a 911 on my rear bumper.

I forgot to move my left foot off the brake and when I went to clutch and up-shift by mistake hit the brake peddle and gave a hellacious brake check to the poor 911 racer behind me.

Since then I've found that with the left foot brake I can transfer weight in the car in a quick and very controlled manner.

I can catch the car immediately with a light touch on the brakes or the gas or sometimes both at the same time.

I even installed a small red brake light on the dash (just above the yellow shift light) of my race cars to let me know if my big foot is resting too heavy on the brake peddle.

I want to try to keep my brake lights off when I'm not actually on the brake.

My pit guy will warn the drivers on grid behind me that I left foot brake and that my intention is not to brake light check everyone.

After a few years of this I have developed the sensitivity in my left foot to brake anything.

After a track day getting on the freeway in my truck and trailer I caught myself left foot braking the rig too.

Last race it came in handy as I was about to pass a car at full throttle when he came across in front of me.

See video, start the pass on the right, tap brake and barely lift to go around on the left.

https://youtu.be/UR04l6sAj64?t=6m18s

Edited by Michael
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Hi Michael, what track is that? All the cones made me a little dizzy!? I race in the US quite a bit but mostly east coast tracks in an old corvette.

Agree left foot braking aids stability, but for my car its usually a 3rd gear (4speed) trick to settle the car before a sharp turn in...

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Chodosh your Vette sounds cool, do you have some you tube in car track videos?

Is there an off topic thread here for non Porsche cars?

This was a temporary track in San Diego, on the Coronado/Navy North Island airport runways and taxiways.

One of the last races still held on an active military airport.

It has been canceled for next year due to construction.

http://www.svra.com/news/construction-forces-cancellation-of-2017-coronado-speed-festival/

It was a short track and I feel my LFB was a big advantage helping to pitch and catch the car.

The track had bumps and drops, different asphalt and concrete surfaces and crowned Runways and Taxiways.

As race cars got more HP and bigger slicks the rough airport tracks (Sebring too) put a beating on drive-lines and suspensions.

Yes and it can also be just a sea of cones. :wacko:

(This Friday/Saturday we will be hot lapping at a proper track, Laguna Seca)

Fred keep practicing in the your street car, it will improve your left foot sensitivity.

This video talks more about LFB.

LFB was my biggest car control improvement, it works for me.

https://youtu.be/xl7O01h7MU4

fwiw this flying 911 was caught in the act at Coronado.

http://www.ferdinandmagazine.com/penske-porsche-911-rsr-us-historic-racing-crash

All I saw after the fact...

https://youtu.be/TV2YLMrY58w?t=4m40s

Edited by Michael
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Chodosh your Vette sounds cool, do you have some you tube in car track videos?

Is there an off topic thread here for non Porsche cars?

This was a temporary track in San Diego, on the Coronado/Navy North Island airport runways and taxiways.

One of the last races still held on an active military airport.

It has been canceled for next year due to construction.

http://www.svra.com/news/construction-forces-cancellation-of-2017-coronado-speed-festival/

It was a short track and I feel my LFB was a big advantage helping to pitch and catch the car.

The track had bumps and drops, different asphalt and concrete surfaces and crowned Runways and Taxiways.

As race cars got more HP and bigger slicks the rough airport tracks (Sebring too) put a beating on drive-lines and suspensions.

Yes and it can also be just a sea of cones. :wacko:

(This Friday/Saturday we will be hot lapping at a proper track, Laguna Seca)

Fred keep practicing in the your street car, it will improve your left foot sensitivity.

This video talks more about LFB.

LFB was my biggest car control improvement, it works for me.

fwiw this flying 911 was caught in the act at Coronado.

http://www.ferdinandmagazine.com/penske-porsche-911-rsr-us-historic-racing-crash

All I saw after the fact...

Hi Michael, if you Google "Chodosh Corvette" you'll see some pics and videos of my fathers 59 and my 58...

I was at Road Atlanta last year and Sebring and hope to do Sebring with the SVRA in March :-)

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  • 3 weeks later...

Yeah some high compression pop with no mufflers can make a grown man flinch.

This was measured at 115db on a 102db day.

I question the 115? That's with a 2 into 1 single 5 inch muffler.

But they measure it 50 feet from the edge of the track on this short straight.

Next straight the sound exceeded black flag.

The dog ring straight gear trans makes a lot of noise too.

Always ear plugs of radio ear buds.

https://youtu.be/mzGd208TfYM?t=5m12s

post-3241-0-87924600-1484678980_thumb.jpg

Edited by Michael
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