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33 minutes ago, Phill said:

That is your problem. I would say 9 o'clock at normal motorway speeds is too hot. I think you need to change them back to original.

At motorway speeds temperature is below 9 o'clock.

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Think those rubber lines won't be helping you one bit. The original metal lines form part of the heat radiation system. You're basically blocking part of the heat escape route using rubber lines. Check them when the engine is hot and I bet they'll be cooler to the touch than the front rad. 

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I’ld replace those rubber lines pronto; the hard lines originally fitted presented a fairly large surface area which was surfaced cooled by air flow, this would be negated by flexible lines......unbelievable that someone would do this!!??! ###@@

David

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18 minutes ago, David Gander said:

unbelievable that someone would do this!!??! ###@@

It was probably a decision based on cost...

I have to say that in normal operation oil temperatures are perfectly fine. Yesterday, however, was quite hot and track driving put a thermal stress far beyond what I can achieve when driving fast on a public road!

I have been looking at Elephant Racing finned oil lines. They are made out of brass which is a good thermal conductor. About 5 metres of finned oil lines exposed to airflow (I don't have rocker panels) could be a nice radiator in itself :) Has anyone around here tried them?

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8 hours ago, David Gander said:

I’ld replace those rubber lines pronto; the hard lines originally fitted presented a fairly large surface area which was surfaced cooled by air flow, this would be negated by flexible lines......unbelievable that someone would do this!!??! ###@@

David

Many competition 911's - circuit, safari etc run braided lines to the cooler. If they are sized correctly and the right liner they won't be causing the problems on this car. If they are rubber coolant hoses then the liner could be degrading.

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Yes, but most completion cars have extra oil cooling radiators and fans, cooling from the oil lines would be negligible in those circumstances.

D.

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49 minutes ago, David Gander said:

Yes, but most completion cars have extra oil cooling radiators and fans, cooling from the oil lines would be negligible in those circumstances.

D.

They have a single external oil cooler under the duck or at the front of the car, not seen any additional fans. 

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7 minutes ago, ras62 said:

Rubber will degrade, you don't want that in the oil system!

Not if you use the right rubber ;)

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On a night out, always check your rubbers before.....ops wrong thread........:ninja:

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12 hours ago, David Gander said:

Yes, but most completion cars have extra oil cooling radiators and fans, cooling from the oil lines would be negligible in those circumstances.

 

Exactly. I'm now evaluating whether it's simpler/cheaper to

  • change the stock SC front heat exchanger for a 3.2 style one
  • change the oil lines running from the engine to the stock SC heat exchanger
  • add a second oil heat exchanger to be extra safe and ready for the day when I upgrade the engine

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9 hours ago, WP0ZZZ said:
 

Exactly. I'm now evaluating whether it's simpler/cheaper to

  • change the stock SC front heat exchanger for a 3.2 style one
  • change the oil lines running from the engine to the stock SC heat exchanger
  • add a second oil heat exchanger to be extra safe and ready for the day when I upgrade the engine

Establish what is causing the problem.

measure the temperature of the oil in the tank and cooler.

There could be many reasons why your temperature gauge shows a high reading.

Faulty gauge 

Blocked thermostat

Timing / fuel issues 

Mechanical problems.

If everything is working correctly and in good condition your current setup should be fine.

Did you check the engine cooler and duct supplying air from the fan?

18 hours ago, ras62 said:

Rubber will degrade, you don't want that in the oil system!

Numerous rubber hoses in the factory fitted system. The problem starts when people buy the wrong type of rubber. Lots of poor quality hoses especially the braided types available online. Quality hoses are quite expensive so many jump at the low quality alternatives hoping for the best.

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2 hours ago, Leicestershire said:

Establish what is causing the problem.

Mechanical problems.

If everything is working correctly and in good condition your current setup should be fine.

As mentioned above you need to check that the gauges are correctly recording the actual temperatures -  I had a faulty Alternator that caused my gauges to show read wong - temp reading high,  and oil pressure reading low, but no other signs apart for a very slow crank on start up.   

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