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IB related 3D printables


Northy

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I've recently purchased a 3D printer.  Once you get digging on this stuff there are already quite a few useful designs out there, so I thought it would be handy to pull together a reference library. Here's a starter: 

 
If you stumble across any more, please copy the list above and bung them onto the end of the list. 
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2 hours ago, Phill said:

Which printer did you get Lewis?

I went for a Creality Ender 3 Pro.  Mainly being used to print off little hot rod engines and stuff for my sons to modify Hot Wheels with. They had me shipping them from Aus before; which is obviously madness.  I’m pleased with it and can see it being pretty useful.  I was put onto tinkercad.com which is so easy my 6 year old is having a go on it. Should be fun experimenting with it. 
 

I’ve got that phone holder printing at the moment. Looks decent so far 👍

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That model is basically the same as the one we have, very good. Make sure you do regular maintenance to keep it running nicely. Don't let your filament get damp!

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5 hours ago, Phill said:

That model is basically the same as the one we have, very good. Make sure you do regular maintenance to keep it running nicely. Don't let your filament get damp!

What maintenance do you have to do? I know nothing of this world!.... 

 

The phone mount came out lovely. Just need a swivel mag mount to stick on it. 

4B9FA064-1A77-4887-B98F-D1260AF78F37.jpeg

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Looks very good. A little bit course but that could be a number of things like nozzle size, layer thickness, speed etc. What slicer are you using? The Creality one is the best for your machine.

You need to make sure your rollers are nice and tight periodically and adjust them if need be. It's important to level the bed and/or the z axis (the beam that goes up and down) occasionally. If your filament gets moisture in it it will affect the print quality. Strangely, if is gets moisture in it it gets brittle and can snap easily. Buy some silica gel and a Tupperware box big enough to put the reel in. You can dry the silica gel in the oven after use and reuse. Wrap the reel in a plastic bag when not in use. You can do this on the machine, no need to remove it. The nozzles wear out so get some spares. Job lots from eBay are fine. The Bowden tube can be easily damaged and does wear out. Don't buy cheap Bowden cable but have some on standby.

The first you will know that something is amiss is when then print comes out badly.

I don't know what you are using on the bed but we use watered down PVA which works very well. We generally clean and recoat the bed between all prints. A print that comes off the bed half way through is very annoying.

We learnt this all by trial and error and there are very helpful vids on Reddit. 

We needed a ceiling rose the other day. Couldn't find the right size or shape online, 12 hours later i was as sticking a printed one to the ceiling. These are great bits of kit.

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I see one in my ‘saved for later’ list in Amazon.

Managing to resist at the moment but worried what might happen after a few Xmas drinks 🤣

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1 minute ago, Nige said:

How tough are the printed items, they always look well brittle.  I guess that is not the case?

Not brittle as long as you set the infill correctly. Also the design helps obviously. The biggest restriction is heat. PLA is only good to about 60 degrees. ABS is better but much more difficult to print with, you really need an enclosed printer. After that your are into the realms of very expensive machines or professional only.

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We’ve been using KW Special Projects (based at Bicester Heritage) for all our 3d print stuff.  
 

The key to getting it right is to know the material and that’s where specialist knowledge is required.  
 

We have parts that are as tough as nylon,  high temperature parts and show parts that are as good a finish as injection moulding.  I’ve even seen a printed fan belt.
 

IMO a machine it is not worth the investment at the moment since the cost of outsourced parts is not that expensive.   Better use of time is to learn how to 3D model. 

6 minutes ago, Jonny Hart said:

 

Edited by Jonny Hart
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35 minutes ago, Jonny Hart said:

We’ve been using KW Special Projects (based at Bicester Heritage) for all our 3d print stuff.  
 

The key to getting it right is to know the material and that’s where specialist knowledge is required.  
 

We have parts that are as tough as nylon,  high temperature parts and show parts that are as good a finish as injection moulding.  I’ve even seen a printed fan belt.
 

IMO a machine it is not worth the investment at the moment since the cost of outsourced parts is not that expensive.   Better use of time is to learn how to 3D model. 

It's not worth buying a machine for a business like yours for sure but for someone who has an interest and likes to make stuff for themselves or a few bits for others it is %100 worth it. Our machine has paid for itself many times over and that's not including the parts we have sold. For example the ceiling rose I mentioned earlier saved me £30 minimum alone.

However, you are right with regard to 3d modelling. Unless you can do that it is very limited and not much more than a (convenient) toy.

4 hours ago, GaryH said:

It's the rough finish that I can't be doing with.

Seems possible to get a better (smooth) finish but most parts I've seen have the rough finish ? 

Very smooth and detailed finishes are easy to achieve but you have to weigh up time against the desired result. 

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12 minutes ago, Jonny Hart said:

IMO a machine it is not worth the investment at the moment since the cost of outsourced parts is not that expensive.   Better use of time is to learn how to 3D model. 

^^^this^^^and this^^^

Home 3D printing set ups are more for a hobby and making 'fun' parts, great way for kids to learn some real design and make lessons

I'm learning SolidWorks with my son, it seems a capable CAD package and even free with a Student ID, more than adequate for any home project

3D models also open up the world of machined parts too 😎 make sure whatever program you use can create STEP or IGES files as these are the most common 3D geometry formats manufacturing companies use

Have over 20yrs of 3D modelling and printed part manufacturing in both metallic and plastic materials, by no means an expert but happy to explain 3D modelling basics if anyone feels it's a little daunting to learn or is stuck and needs help

 

 

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10 hours ago, Phill said:

Very smooth and detailed finishes are easy to achieve but you have to weigh up time against the desired result. 

Trouble is, most people selling printed parts seem to opt to produce them as quickly and  cheaply as possible. 

Unfortunately for me the phrase '3D-printed' has become a byword for 'roughly-finished crap' and I now actively avoid anything that uses that term :(

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2 minutes ago, GaryH said:

Trouble is, most people selling printed parts seem to opt to produce them as quickly and  cheaply as possible. 

Unfortunately for me the phrase '3D-printed' has become a byword for 'roughly-finished crap' and I now actively avoid anything that uses that term :(

Bit sad for you then really. Doesn't take much to research what the product is like before you buy. Why do you think rennsport phone holders are so expensive? They don't come off the cnc cutter polished and painted do they? The option is there for you to prep and paint to your high standard if you want to. Or not if you have money to burn.

Lewis's phone holder is excellent, cost next to nothing, will do its job and mostly won't be seen when in place, what's not to like?

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I'm fine if it's printed to a decent finish Phill but what I'm saying is that most things aren't (and don't have the option to chose them to be printed to a higher quality). I guess the perfectionist in me can't be doing with that grainy finish. Lots use very low infill rate and are also brittle as a result. 

If I buy a custom product I don't want the time and faff of sanding it myself ! 

I'd rather get something properly finished (injection moulded or whatever). 

For me personally the (young) 3d-printing (often cottage) industry has a bit of an image problem. :twocents:

 

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Don't think it has an image problem, this 'cottage industry' has quite the opposite image for me 😍😎

Love that people can build stuff at home and if they can make money from their hobby or more importantly inspire their kids to pursue a career in manufacturing, engineering or design, then power to them!

I think it falls over for unsatisfied customers is because '3D printing' has been touted as the answer to everything ever made so customers that don't do enough research expect too much from it when buying bargain priced parts

I'm sure these same customers are first to shy away from paying a realistic price for a high quality part as it's just too expensive

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16 hours ago, Jonny Hart said:

We’ve been using KW Special Projects (based at Bicester Heritage) for all our 3d print stuff.  
 

The key to getting it right is to know the material and that’s where specialist knowledge is required.  
 

We have parts that are as tough as nylon,  high temperature parts and show parts that are as good a finish as injection moulding.  I’ve even seen a printed fan belt.
 

IMO a machine it is not worth the investment at the moment since the cost of outsourced parts is not that expensive.   Better use of time is to learn how to 3D model. 

Jonny

Try ABEN Europe and 3 D Systems. 

Both supply parts to volume manufacturing environments.

Tried and tested

Flappa2

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Don’t get carried away boys. I don’t think anyone is suggesting a 150 quid printer is going to put out anything other than hobby stuff.  I’m just pissing around making a few useful bits and bobs and little hot rod engines, guns and ladders for my boys to glue onto their hot wheels 😂  It’s fun and we’re learning as we go.  Seems like an active and helpful community. 

I’m £3.50 into this phone mount and it will look fine in the car (assuming it fits). 
 

96A22821-911A-4B52-9F7E-18FC3875699F.thumb.jpeg.2bfa49b6410db68df80aad87acad37ef.jpeg


I did have to laugh at Gary the perfectionist 😂 😂😂

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