Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Not sure if I've mentioned it before but I have a '62 356 which is currently getting a 2.4 911 engine stuffed up its bum. I have posted a fairly detailed report on our good friends DDK website under 'Project 25' but the car is very nearly finished with the engine and 915 gearbox re-installed, hopefully for the last time. I reckon the engine looks pretty good with its Triple Webers thrusting up so I thought I would bung a couple of piccys here. The only jobbies left to do on the car is some wiring then a hook up for the clutch cable and sort out the throttle linkage, also we have to sort out spring rates for the supplementary Koni coilovers fitted. I reckon about 180lbs should put us in the ball park, I don't want it track stiff but I do want it firm, ooo do you like it it firm Sir ooo suits you!    

N 15.3.jpg

P 15.3.jpg

R 15.3.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

35 minutes ago, Beaky said:

Looks fav, what are you doing brake wise ?

Standard drums but with extra tight pants to keep the liquid fear from spoiling the interior 😆

Does look mega, we need more photos please

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's quite a lot - why not pop over there and have a look ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I put standard 944 front brakes on it and the rears are standard early short wheelbase spec 911 discs. The handbrake system is all new stock parts but the cable goes to a 911 floor mounted handbrake. I would love to get a pair of 944 turbo callipers for the front although I might have to fabricate a new pair of adapters for them and I'm not sure what the bolt spacing is on them. I don't know if I can copy over my posting history on DDK as there might be some copyright stuff I may infringe, just put DDK into google, search 356 then look for Project 25 and you can be bored shitless for hours.

 

104.jpg

E 15.3.jpg

L 15.3.jpg

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

I was down at Classic Fabs last Wednesday to see how my little 356 was doing, and it was doing quite well, but there are still a few niggling little problems halting the car from burning up the asphalt. The main piece of grief is the oil becoming very aerated on its return to the tank seen by the clear tubing which is sited alongside the oil tank located in the engine compartment. I now know what the problem is having consulted a guy who races 911s. The oil has to be given a somewhat tortuous routing back to the tank so Steve at Classic Fab is going to cut open the oil tank to route the return pipe so it flows directly onto one side of the tank plus add baffling as you would find in a race car wet sump. The other problem we have is with regard to the fuelling of the Weber carbs. The offside bank will not supply gas correctly. It could be a float problem or it could be emulsion tube or simply jetting. Anyway the car is off down to Plymouth where there is a fully equipped rolling road and it will stay there until it runs right. It is pretty cool at the moment though with flames shooting up out of the carb throats, not great for the paintwork however. So it could be May, hey that's this month, or more than likely June when I get the wee beastie back in the security and warmth of my garage. If it is July which I seriously do doubt, it would be 3 very long years since I have driven my car, and I really, really want to drive this car. 

DSCN1035.JPG

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Love everything about this car!

there’s a couple of soft top 356s that I lust after when I’m at the coast. 
they aren’t garage queens, have loads of patina and show a life well lived. 
 

just perfect!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Hello Kats n Kittens, certainly had some fun this week. Top chap  Patrick whose middle name is Weber stripped down the naughty o/s bank of carbs and as thought found half a British Rail cheese sandwich clogging up the jets and emulsion tubes with a few crumbs also residing in the float chambers. After blasting the crud out with a couple of tins of super strength carb cleaner then reassembling with new gaskets, the engine was running like a dream. We were so pleased after all the grief we were giving it plenty of beans plus a few revs too many and we didn't notice the oil pressure had climbed to 90 psi. We did notice it had when the gasket got blown out of the oil filter and the engine dumped about a gallon of crude on the workshop floor. Big oops. On detailed inspection what had happened was that the oil relief valve had become stuck, not seized, it just looked like there was a tide mark which had the effect of holding the valve. A light hone of the chamber and a lighter rated spring sorted this problem  However I still had the old oil frothing problem so after speaking with experts ie guys that race 911's it was decided to pull the oil tank, cut it open and totally re-vamp the pipe-work and internals. Hopefully the photos will illustrate what was done but basically is re-route the return pipe so it came into the top then exit onto the side of the tank where the oil will enter into a swirl function then through a perforated system to eliminate all froth. The feed pipe was moved from the bottom to the side with a swan neck suction feed to the bottom which will stop any oil seeping down into the engine when it is not running. Lastly we enlarged and smoothed the chambers in the oil filter housing to aid flow. That got stitched up with all fingers crossed that there were no leaks, there weren't, started the engine - 50 to 60 psi and No frothing of oil, absolutely nil aeration. Deepest joy, a massive relief after all the problems.  So the end is nigh, just a few more little jobbies to do, one of which was to junk my old bike cable throttle system and braze up some old 911 parts which will give a straight and direct pull back to the carbs. There is a bit of fabrication to do on the rear disc brakes - dust shields - unobtainable then take the bugger for a test drive. I'll let you know how I get on.  

356 18.5.jpg

356 e18.5.jpg

356 f18.5.jpg

356 g18.5.jpg

356 h18.5.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Between this and the Dax, you must have your hands full, but what wonderful creation they will be when completed :bowdown: 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

 

Sounds really good :signs85:

Edited by Phill
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

It's always the minor jobs, the unimportant ones that keep being put back until they become items that just have to be addressed. One such job was to fabricate inner covers for the brake discs on the rear, another was to hook up the handbrake cables. Whilst I was still restoring the old dog I decided that the stock handbrake had to go, it was an umbrella handle affair under the dashboard just like you used to find on old Ford Pops. Anyway I didn't have half the necessary parts in the cardboard boxes of stuff I originally got with the car so I fitted an early 911 handbrake assembly on the floor near to the drivers seat. The old rear brakes I had fitted were VW type because I wanted the 5 on 130mil PCD so I could run Fuchs rims. It was an easy hook up at the time with a small bracket being the cable end but this was where the transmission crossmember was now so the handbrake cable had no stopping point until Steve shaped and welded up a pair of mounts and tacked them under the trans crossmember, of course this meant cross member off, clean the welds, re-paint and re-install. Another small jobbie now done. With the oil aerating problems fully solved and the oil cooler being reinstated it was thought a small guard should be fitted to stop any debris from the front wheel cutting into it. This was done together with a mesh guard where there is a hole in the front wing which used to house a light or indicator, I really can't remember what but anyway no nasties can get through there now. And lastly, you'll be pleased to hear, was our small problemette of blowing exhaust gaskets every time the car was out for a test drive. This was a classic case of we'll sort this next week because we knew it was going to be a right a%@eole. The headers I'm running have very thick flanges which when installed left insufficient stud length for the nuts to grab onto. The only solution was to replace all the exhaust studs with nice new long stainless steel pieces. Unfortunately the old studs had been in residence for best part of 47 years and, not surprisingly, they didn't appreciate being disturbed, but, we drilled the bastards out, re-tapped the holes and now everything is screwed down nice and tight. Actually I have only just realised I haven't got a heater in the car, there must be a solution to this, I hope. Well, that's about it, I left Steve and co sorting out the castor, camber and we're still not too happy with the spring rates on the Koni coil overs but it's very, very near to being on the road, although there will be an interior to be organised as all the scabby bits of vinyl need to be replaced, and I suppose that will be a few more grand but hey ho, it's only money          

356 n 12.6.jpg

356 h 12.6.jpg

356 f 12.6.jpg

356 j 12.6.jpg

356 o 12.6.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good heavens no Clive, I shall be attired in the manner of elderly 356 owners with Dunn and Co tweed jacket, cavalry twill slacks, the Yorkshire shirt and rather racy silk cravat. 

Bang on ! 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...