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Fitting SSI’s


AdamMJ

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Hi folks, Can any of you guys recommend a garage that has experience of fitting SSi’s? Seems to be quite a specialised job so would like to find someone who’s done it before. 
thanks

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It's actually an easy enough job right up until you break a stud. Then it's a proper PITA. Where are you? Although I'd imagine any decent mechanic could do this for you, no need to use a Porsche specialist. 

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4 hours ago, AdamMJ said:

Hi folks, Can any of you guys recommend a garage that has experience of fitting SSi’s? Seems to be quite a specialised job so would like to find someone who’s done it before. 
thanks

Whereabouts are you.  A decent Porsche indie doesn’t charge high labour rates and will know all of the challenges with this job, mostly around the studs as already mentioned.

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These are essentially just big manifolds and fit on pretty much like any other manifold. You don't need a specialist, your local, trusted, mechanic can do it. Yes, studs can break but that's just the same as any other car. I had two go on my Fiat 500 and had to drill those out same as I had to drill some out on my SC when I put my SSIs on. Don't overthink it.

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Thanks Phill, I think that's more or less what I said. Only thing I would add would be if/when a stud breaks make sure your man (or woman) has a proper drill jig or perhaps gets in a proper nut 'n bolt removal guy (or woman) in. Better still, whip 'em all out and replace with new, mine are all stainless although stainless has it's down sides too......

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Thanks guys, sound advice and you’re right about not overthinking it ;) I’m just aware that sometimes there are ‘tricks of the trade’ that can be applied which can avoid breaking studs etc. Also, having the right tools for specific cars can help. I’m in South Wales but happy to travel if there’s someone who comes recommended 👍🏻

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Discount 9 in Cardiff will do this easy enough

DIYable, get the nuts cherry red before you try and undo hem!

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4 hours ago, AdamMJ said:

Thanks guys, sound advice and you’re right about not overthinking it ;) I’m just aware that sometimes there are ‘tricks of the trade’ that can be applied which can avoid breaking studs etc. Also, having the right tools for specific cars can help. I’m in South Wales but happy to travel if there’s someone who comes recommended 👍🏻

Chris Denning in Cardiff has a good reputation so too the new owner of the Porsche specialist in Penarth. 

I've used the Penarth outfit but under the previous owner.

Good luck

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Lovely guy Chris Denning but getting a car into him is a nightmare! 

I've heard good things about a newish specialist called the ramp room in cwmbran. 

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I've just done this job and it was somewhat harder than I expected.

I have done most repairs on cars, including complete engine builds, gearbox rebuild work and welding bodywork - but nothing older than 20 years before.

The large nuts on the oil lines to the external thermostat are very very unlikely to loosen. I posted a picture recently of sorting this with a Dremel.

The classic line replacement oil lines were some way from being the right shape, and took some bending and manipulating to fit.

My HEs have been off in recent times so no broken studs, but i did have one that pulled out with thread attached. This one I drilled and tapped to M10, and bolted for now. I have some M10 to M8 exhaust studs in the post and will replace with one of those so its stronger than new. I also have a slight blow on at least one cylinder so need to take a wee look at that.

Getting the ducting on was a bit of a pig too.

Its perhaps a 4 spanner job - where it would be a 2 spanner on a new car.

 

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