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To weld or not to weld


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I have the911 at my local independent porsche specialist who has carried out a full service and adjusted the valves. They have also investigated oil leaks and have found one leak in the return pipe running the length of the car and another from the main oil tank in the rear wheel arch.

They have recommended I change the tank and are awaiting a price from Porsche, if I purchase from Type911 its circa £700.

However, my question is if the tank can be welded is this good/bad and should it be done and if so what caveats apply?

Many thanks.

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I had one welded once and it did not work. It was ugly and ended up still leaking. My advice would be to have it brazed or find a good second hand one which is what I did in the end.

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Posted (edited)

I’m not sure Nige, I’ve only discussed it on the phone with them. However they did say that although they weld stuff they wouldn’t touch it and whenever I come back from a drive there’s always a splotch of oil that forms up behind the rear wheel.

I talked to them this morning and the price from Porsche is £1044 which compared to a Dansk unit costing £610 isn’t too bad I suppose.

I am already faced with a £1000 bill for the service and valve adjustment plus a drive shaft CV boot needed replacing and the top rubber mounts on the rear shocks have been replaced. In addition to this the connectors from the heat exchangers to the pipes to pump warm air into the cabin will be replaced.

Since I’ve been driving it for the last year and the leak hasn’t got any worse I’m considering leaving it till I’ve saved enough funds to replace the tank and one of the long oil pipes which will be £1400 all in.

I’ve already replaced all shock absorbers on the car recently and that wasn’t cheap so waiting till I’ve enough of a budget might be best.

Edited by SurlySurdi
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Posted (edited)
4 hours ago, SurlySurdi said:

Since I’ve been driving it for the last year and the leak hasn’t got any worse I’m considering leaving it till I’ve saved enough funds to replace the tank and one of the long oil pipes which will be £1400 all in.

Lower risk if the leak is fairly high up on the tank.  If it's low down and the hole gets bigger, you risk loosing all of you oil.  A second hand tank is likely to be half the cost of a new Dansk one, but it will be of unknown quality.  A big portion of your cost will be labour.

Edited by PeterK
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Posted (edited)

The leak is near the top of the tank luckily, they want 220 to cover the labour which I think is reasonable?

I’ll definitely buy a new tank as I don’t want to go through changing it again. 

Edited by SurlySurdi
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Good plan 👍

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I don't understand the reluctance to weld it..... It has to be removed from the car anyway for replacement so while off, pressure check it, have a look inside (endoscope perhaps) and take it to a specialist welder. Goodness, the rust bucket cars/shells we have all seen on here restored to great beauty by skilled welders, surely an oil tank is an easy job for the right person. 

 

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2 hours ago, Chris T said:

I don't understand the reluctance to weld it..... It has to be removed from the car anyway for replacement so while off, pressure check it, have a look inside (endoscope perhaps) and take it to a specialist welder. Goodness, the rust bucket cars/shells we have all seen on here restored to great beauty by skilled welders, surely an oil tank is an easy job for the right person. 

 

They are quite thin making welding a bit difficult. As I said above brazing would be the better option. I think it's crazy to buy new if it's just a couple.of pin holes high up.

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Big assumption that it’s just a couple of pinholes.  If there are a few now, more than likely there are a few more ready to appear.  If you’re already paying someone to remove the tank, then the peace of mind of a new Dansk tank is worth the little extra.  If you’re doing the work yourself, then patch it.

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11 hours ago, PeterK said:

 If there are a few now, more than likely there are a few more ready to appear. 

Also an assumption, condition won't be known until it's removed.

11 hours ago, PeterK said:

little extra

Wish I lived in a world where £600 was a "little extra" :blink:

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Obviously while pressure checking and looking around inside you can access whether it's repairable or not. Most things are if you find a skilled welder/brazer. 

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  • 4 weeks later...

Thanks for all the advice. When I get the tank removed I think I will make a decision then. The Dansk is looking like a good choice if I decide to replace. I can’t see it being the kind of part where buying a genuine part will make a whole lot of difference.

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  • 2 weeks later...

These tanks contain various baffles and plates. They are almost impossible to clean internally so chances of residual debris getting into the oil system is high. Engine damage easily follows so a new tank is a wise move.

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