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Kirk Valve Lash Adjustment Tool Question


Lesworth

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Kev ( @Fuchs915) has kindly lent me his Kirk tool for me to try as I am due to adjust valves during service. It looks pretty easy to use and Pelican has an excellent instruction video on youtube. My question is on checking. Previously, when use the three handed feeler gauge, screwdriver and spanner method, I have found it necessary to go back round the rotations at least another one time to check clearances as they often move a little when tightening up the lock nut.

For anyone that has used this tool,  do you feel it necessary to go back round and check with a feeler gauge after setting everything once with the tool?

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Hi Les,

You shouldn't need to as setting per the markings on the tool should give the 'perfect' gap, assuming your adjuster and/or rocker aren't fubar'd.  Note what I said about the adjuster sometimes moving when you secure the lock nut but this should be obvious from the tool.  You simply look at how much it moved beyond the set mark and re-do it compensating for that when you do the set up.  Nothing to stop you checking them with a feeler gauge after you've had a play, do each one while you are there for peace of mind.

Good luck!

KJ

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here is a little video i made no feeler gauge necessary or other tools..i have doing it like this since the early 1980`s and never ever i had any problems;-)

 

Ivan

 

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Les has the perfect appendages for valve adjustments!

bigmouth-inc-tiny-hands-p466-1739_medium

I'm with Ivan on this.  Though you do need you fingers dialled in with some people just don't have :)

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13 hours ago, Nige said:

Les has the perfect appendages for valve adjustments!

bigmouth-inc-tiny-hands-p466-1739_medium

I'm with Ivan on this.  Though you do need you fingers dialled in with some people just don't have :)

Now then Nige. Steady. I might have to find 'that' photo. 

14 hours ago, proporsche said:

here is a little video i made no feeler gauge necessary or other tools..i have doing it like this since the early 1980`s and never ever i had any problems;-)

 

Ivan

 

If only we all had your Jedi skills Ivan!

It has to be said that the Kirk tool is a far better way to do valve adjustments but make no mistake, its still a sh&t job. Still a bit fiddly but took about half the time it usually takes me. I like the certainty of the gap and consistency across all the valves versus using the feeler gauge.

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Am I right I'm thinking that Ivans method is the simple "do it by feel"?

It should be, do it up so no movement and then back off by eighth of a turn, shouldn't it? Then check with the feeler. 

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9 minutes ago, Phill said:

Am I right I'm thinking that Ivans method is the simple "do it by feel"?

It should be, do it up so no movement and then back off by eighth of a turn, shouldn't it? Then check with the feeler. 

1/10th turn based on 1mm thread pitch?

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Les,I  used to use the feeler but i got burned once back in the 1980`s doing exactly this turbo on this video.I finish the job and the valves were noise like a tractor.

So i had to take everything apart the same day .So i spent weekend doing like 20 adjustments in a row just by feel.Back then i did check with a feeler But from that week on, i always did them only by feel...

 

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Posted (edited)
22 minutes ago, Fuchs915 said:

1/10th turn based on 1mm thread pitch?

Probably, what's 0.025 between friends :lol: Yes, I know, before any one says, a damaged engine.....

Didn't 

@jevvy have a homemade tool out of a screwdriver and a couple of nails?

7 minutes ago, proporsche said:

 

 

Ha, brilliant 👍

Edited by Phill
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