Jump to content

Maintaining tyre pressures


Recommended Posts

I’m interested in how everyone does this at home.  My car usually loses 2-4 psi over 2-3 months and this has happened regardless of type of tyre fitted and has done it for years.  I don’t have a tyre pressure gauge at home, nor a pump with gauge.  I just accept that every so often I need to go to the nearest garage which is five miles away and put some air in.  What do you do, do you have a gauge or a pump or what?  I saw this Bosch pump on a Halfords advert which if accurate could be a good solution, but there will be others.

https://www.halfords.com/tools/power-tools-and-accessories/power-tools/bosch-easypump-air-pump-733358.html

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a Dewalt battery powered portable compressor. Works very well cuts off when it reaches the pressure you set. Already have the battery and charger so made sense for me to get it. It’s very accurate as I have checked it with a calibrated gauge.

phil

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the Ring pump too. I also have a a digital pressure gauge that measures to 2 decimal places on a psi setting.
The only issue I found with the Ring is the guage under reads by about 1.5psi compares to the digital gauge which I sense is more accurate. 
The Bosch looks a great piece of kit although a bit expensive - the gauge is probably accurate and it can pump to a high pressure. 
Eitherway, something to pump up your tyres is a good addition to your tool kit!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a cheap Aldi brand cordless drill like pump. Where the chuck should be a hose exits. I've tested it for accuracy against a proper gauge and it's spot on. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

https://shop.ringautomotive.com/rac820-heavy-duty-digital-tyre-inflator-12v-dc.html?utm_source=google_shopping&gad=1&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxo383cyDgAMVis3tCh2yPwgsEAQYAiABEgJsmPD_BwE

Over the years, I have used the Porsche type, the universal type supplied with many new cars but they all fail if used regularly. The above is very good - usually available from Screwfix. It is corded so it needs a 12 volt supply The 'chuck' is one of the better types that only opens the valve once a full seal has been made - minimising the amount of air that escapes when removing the fitting. Makita and others make a similar quality cordless unit but you obviously need to buy into the relevant battery system.

Just as note from my recent observations:

Over the years I have always used a high quality dial pressure gauge (the gauge cost 2x price of the above pump 15 years ago!)  to confirm tyre pressures but the digital gauge fitted on the pump and even the built in tyre sensors used on modern cars provide identical results. 

Tip - convert your desired pressure to kPa.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Unless you must have a portable solution just have a compressor in the garage, coupled with a garage quality calibrated metal bodied tyre inflator.

Have lost count of the number of all in one tyre compressor / inflators I've gone through over the years - they all fall apart in the end, and having a compressor opens up so many options for other purposes. Similarly, consider compressor choice first time round.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, mean in green said:

Unless you must have a portable solution just have a compressor in the garage, coupled with a garage quality calibrated metal bodied tyre inflator.

Have lost count of the number of all in one tyre compressor / inflators I've gone through over the years - they all fall apart in the end, and having a compressor opens up so many options for other purposes. Similarly, consider compressor choice first time round.

Try the Ring portable it's well made and endured inflating big 4x4 tyres on a daily basis for 6 months back in the COVID days when tyres / puncture repairs were unavailable & it fits in the corner of a boot without taking up space. 

 A full compressor system could be considered a little excessive just to add 2 to 4 psi to car tyres every couple of moths. Remember compressed air is one of the least efficient energy sources and whilst it has other uses around the home - nail guns, drills, sanders etc. many manufacturing businesses are looking to alternatives like cordless tools to increase flexibility and score additional environmental points.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a small garage compressor which works great for a small 'fleet' of family cars coming and going. I also use it for other purposes around the garage, I wouldn't be without it to be honest.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I too have a compressor and a garage forecourt quality gauge. However, I have 5 cars and like to spray stuff from time to time. Came in handy the other day for my daughter's 21st and we had 270 balloons to blow up :lol:

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you've bought into a paticular brand of DIY tools rechargable batteries such as Worx or Makita, it's worth checking if they do a tyre inflator, most do and without buying an additional battery or charger can work out quite cheap.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I’ve used one of these for years to keep an eye on pressures and keep an old school foot pump in the car to top up pressures or in case of a slow puncture. https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/363972799563?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&mkrid=711-127632-2357-0&ssspo=9guIMk1tS_q&sssrc=4429486&ssuid=hA-aV6CMQ16&var=&widget_ver=artemis&media=COPY

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...