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Fuel of choice.


KitD

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Wondering what fuel everyone uses in their 3.2. In my other cars I use Esso Supreme 99 as it has no ethanol content in it despite the E5 label on the pump.  
 

I take it additives do very little in these cars but don’t do any harm? 

Edited by KitD
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Posted (edited)

Reading another post on here I see that Esso started rolling out ‘up to 5% ethanol’ in their Supreme 99 in 2023. Anyone know what ‘up to’ actually means? 3% average?! 
 

Also read about Millers VSPe (500ml).

 

Edited by KitD
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"Up to" means exactly that.

I saw a video a while back where someone took petrol samples from numerous pumps.  It turned out most were about 2 - 4% whether E5 or E10. One E10 may have been 5% IIRC.

He reckoned the more alcohol they put in, the more it costs them to make it.

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Posted (edited)

I get 5p off a litre with my nectar points so that has also kept me filling up at my local Esso. I have got some Millers additive, no idea if it’s needed but guess it can’t do any harm. 

Edited by KitD
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My 'Driver's Manual' states a compression ratio of 9.5 :1 and a fuel requirement of 91 RON. Leaded should be avoided.

Therefore, there is no need to spend more on so called premium 99 RON fuel.  Although I have been suckered into this myth for the most part, having filled with the lower RON fuel when the higher wasn't available, I don't remember any knocking.

Moreover, with alcohol levels so low, and advice from my Porsche mechanics that these cars have been ready for ethanol for many years if not decades, I don't see that much damage occurring from using any E number fuel. Although again, I generally go for E5. If I was doing 15,000 miles a year in ye olde Porsche, I would probably go for the cheaper fuel.

So regarding the additive, it may be required for 60s & 70s cars, but at £50 / litre, a bit of an unnecessary expense if they've been converted to unleaded and have had new fuel lines / o rings fitted in the last 30 years. Especially as I've also seen some problems caused by additives that claim to preserve  fuel containing ethanol when cars are laid up over winter.

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As I'm just finishing (or should I say my mechanic is) the very expensive business of changing all the fuel lines from the 40 year old stuff, thought I'd chip in. Your received advice that Porsche cars have been ready for ethanol for many years is correct but somewhat irrelevant for our cars as it applies only to the 996/986 generation. Even with my new lines I have been unable to get a definitive 'yes' to whether they are ok, with the most I've received is a 'I'm sure they should be'! I've obviously still gone ahead but will continue using Super (up to E5) to be on the safe side and probably still with an ethanol stripper additive. Why take the risk? Here's the blurb from Porsche....

E10 fuels are suitable for refuelling and thus for running all Porsche vehicles as of year of construction 1996. Specifically, the Boxster (model year 1997) and Carrera (model year 1998) models onwards.

These new fuels, which can include up to 10% ethanol in the future in accordance with new statutory regulations, can be used in all new Porsche vehicles without any problems.

The fuel types Regular E10 (91 RON) and Unleaded E10 (95 RON) are not suitable for use in the following Porsche vehicle types:

Type Year of construction
356 1950-65
911 1965-89
912 1965-69; 1976
964 1989-94
993 1994-98
959 1988-89
914 1970-77
924 1976-88
944 1981-91
968 1991-95
928 1977-95

These Porsche vehicles may not be run on E10 fuel. As an alternative, Super unleaded (98 RON) can be used. With a maximum bioethanol content of 5% (E5 fuel), Super unleaded is compatible with these vehicles.

Edited by RivieraBob
Correction from 'these cars' to 'Porsche cars' to avoid confusion
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Correction: 

My received advice was that all porsche fuel lines have been ethanol ready for decades, and I assumed all fuel lines from the 80s should have been changed by now, within that period.  

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It's a pig of a job to do all the fuel lines though - not just the 3 around the engine, which admittedly are the most dangerous if they go pop. I'm doing front to back (tank to engine) and really not sure all owners will have gone to that trouble/expense. It's quite labour intensive when doing on a fully built car - not such a problem if you're starting from a bare shell. 

I'm pleased however that you had it confirmed that the new lines are ethanol compliant - as I said, I couldn't get anyone to say for certain. I presumed they would be though but as a precaution I'm still staying away from E10 and using an ethanol stripper (to no ill effect).

Bob

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Posted (edited)

I don’t drive it much so the storage element had worried me in the past, I will get my lines inspected (what’s visible) however.

After only doing 1,800 miles in the last 10 years I just need to use it first and foremost! (It’s had a top end rebuild and a body resto in that time)

Edited by KitD
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I just bang in the cheapest E5 at most convenient located station to wherever I am.  If not, then regular unleaded/E10 but just enough to get me home or until I can fill up with E5.  I use mine quite a bit, so any E10 will just get used up pretty quickly.  I've never been brand loyal to petrol.

 

KitD, I think you need to question whether you need the car or not if you've only done 1800 in 10 years!😃 

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16 hours ago, Nige said:

I just bang in the cheapest E5 at most convenient located station to wherever I am.  If not, then regular unleaded/E10 but just enough to get me home or until I can fill up with E5.  I use mine quite a bit, so any E10 will just get used up pretty quickly.  I've never been brand loyal to petrol.

+1. Worked fine for me over 15 years and 50k+ miles. Never noticed any difference between brands.

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Posted (edited)
On 21/04/2024 at 17:43, Nige said:

KitD, I think you need to question whether you need the car or not if you've only done 1800 in 10 years!😃 

No question I need the car, just a lot of life and owning 5 other cars kept the miles low (along with a restoration that took way too long!).

In truth, after 14 years of ownership, I have no plans to sell. It was a keeper from the day I got it.

Just need to use it more now - hence my sudden appearance on the forum!

Edited by KitD
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On 19/04/2024 at 22:38, KitD said:

Wondering what fuel everyone uses in their 3.2. In my other cars I use Esso Supreme 99 as it has no ethanol content in it despite the E5 label on the pump.  
 

I take it additives do very little in these cars but don’t do any harm? 

get yourself an Esso fuel card (if you are a PCGB member), gives you 6p a litre off for Esso supreme. Its what i use all the time now for the discount, whereas it always used to be V-power for me. But i have a tuned engine so it needs 98 all the time.

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i have seen the damage by using the ethanol add in gasoline.Not only to the fuel lines but to the fuel tank......

For me i only use Shell 100 octane gas..plus i got myself ready if they start using (for the 100oct) the additives.

Get yourself lacquer-thinner Toluene..which is de facto being used as a racing fuel..100 oct-plus-half a tank and about 1-2 liters of the magic stuff 

I do not worry about the price-life's too short and our 911 love the best fuels...

vidk.jpg

lsh9.jpg

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Left over F1inshore powerboat racing fuel has some oooomph to it

Think it was similar to Ivan's IPA, mix of airplane AVGAS 110 octane fuel with a splash of Toluen

Drove my Mk1 Astra 1.3ltr van on it once, felt like my car had been given a 2ltr engine transplant, no flat spots, no detination, just oodles of power

Think I'd go for V-Power, spoil your car with the best fuel

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Impossible now to buy anything except 95 E10 in ROI.

Most people here are “head in sand” or relying on dubious additives.

i have used Millers VSPE with 95 E5 when we had that - but not convinced of its efficacy with E10.

My solution now is to drive 5 1/2 hours to Nothern Ireland - stay over with a friend, fill 16 20 litre Jerricans with 99 E5= readily available across the border - and drive home again.

Lasts about 3+months 

C
 

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1 hour ago, anglophone1 said:

Impossible now to buy anything except 95 E10 in ROI.

Most people here are “head in sand” or relying on dubious additives.

i have used Millers VSPE with 95 E5 when we had that - but not convinced of its efficacy with E10.

My solution now is to drive 5 1/2 hours to Nothern Ireland - stay over with a friend, fill 16 20 litre Jerricans with 99 E5= readily available across the border - and drive home again.

Lasts about 3+months 

C
 

i think your answer is right above your post what World Citizen suggested for you boys in Britain..That Toluene is really magic stuff. I used to use it already in Los Angeles back in the 1990`s since i have euro model and it requires 98 plus octane.....

 

Ivan

Edited by proporsche
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Got some Millers delivered and will fill up with Esso 99 (or ‘Esso maybe 94’ as it should now be called) and see how I get on. 

Will research Toluene - never heard of the stuff!

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I’m in Ireland not Britain - 99;0r 100 E5 still available there, only 95 E5 available here.

Isn’t Toluene the stuff dry cleaners use?

c

Edited by anglophone1
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Isn't it the same as gunwash/thinners?  I know 5l of Tetrosyl standard thinners per fill up was a thing done in the Saab scene.  But they have turbos and modern i.e. more intelligent ECUs that can adjust themselves to more potent fuels.

I would have thought going beyond a half decent super unleaded that our cars fuelling systems (CIS or Motronic) wouldn't know what to do with it.  So any benefit is essentially wasted?  Dunno.

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i very much doubt that Tetrosyl is the same as Toluene..;-)

It not about the ecu adjusting(btw you can adjust the ecu for fuel quality on it if you want)

It is about combustion inside the cylinder quality...

A lot of racing peeps use toluene ....

 

Ivan

 

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13 minutes ago, Nige said:

Is it not just thinners then?

 

it is used as a thinner but most often for cars and racing..never mind it is very hard to get ..it is also for making pervitin drugs.Here in Czech you have to sign for it with your biss licence..

Ivan 

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